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Balthazar Recipes

Screaming Viking

This drink has got something of a cult status. It’s been on my list from day one. I concocted it back in 2009 for Carl Evander who introduced me to Swedish Punsch. He was one of the original regulars at Rules Bar when we opened. He’d bring me over bottles from Sweden and I eventually came up with this recipe. Swedish Punsch and Ocho Tequila were made for each other

• 35ml Ocho Blanco Tequila
• 25ml Carlshamns Flaggpunsch
• 5ml Martini Fiero Vermouth
• 5ml agave syrup ( optional)
• 15ml lime juice (retain half lime for garnish)
Glassware – Old Fashioned
Garnish – half lime with a few
drops of grenadine

Add the tequila, Flaggpunsch, agave syrup (if using) and the juice from 1/2 lime to a shaker. Retain the lime for the garnish. Add ice and shake lightly to blend. Don’t do a hard shake. Add the Fiero to balance off. Strain into a large Old Fashioned glass filled with ice.The squeezed lime is the garnish only. Add a few drops of grenadine to the centre of the lime before placing in the drink.

The Balthazar

One of the stars of our menu, this is a great light aperitif cocktail.  Belsazar Vermouth is produced in the south of Baden at the edge of the Black Forest in Germany. There are fourstyles: dry, red, rosé and white. They are made with a blend of six wines flavoured with up to 20 different homegrown spices, herbs, peels and blossoms, including wormwood and smallbatch fruit brandies. The vermouths are finished in stoneware casks. This gives the ingredients time to blend while  reserving their freshness, complexity and balance.

Ingredients
• 35ml Belsazar Rosé Vermouth
• 15ml Sipsmith Vodka
• 15ml Americano Cocchi
• 2 drops Luxardo Mar aschino Liqueur
• 1 drop Briottet Crème de
Violette Liqueur
Glassware – cocktail
Garnish – 1 olive

Method
Fill a mixing glass with ice. Add the ingredients with the drops last. Stir briefly to chill. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

 

Black Mojito

Ingredients
50ml R on Zacapa 23 Rum
15ml Galliano Balsamico
15ml Green Chartreuse
5ml agave syrup
15ml lime juice
8-10 min t leaves, roughly chopped
25ml soda water

Glassware – highball
Garnish – shredded mint

Method

Add all the ingredients, except the soda, into a cocktail shaker. Place a bar spoon in the shaker, disk side down, and add the crushed ice. Muddle quickly, moving the spoon with an up and down motion to incorporate and break down the mint. Double strain into a chilled highball glass which has been filled with crushed ice. Top with soda and shredded mint.

Hint

Try using the juice from a lime for a slightly different balance to the drink.

Bobbi's Sparkle

Serves 1

25ml Sipsmith Gin
15ml elderflower cordial
10ml lemon juice
120ml Champagne

Method
Add the gin , elderflower and lemon juice to an cocktail shaker along with cubes of ice. Shake briefly to mix and strain into a chilled champagne glass.

You can add a bit more or less of the above ingredients to suit your taste or according to the type of champagne (eg. sweeter, add more lemon – dryer add more elderflower)

Roast grouse with bread sauce and game chips and plum chutney

Serves 4

4 whole oven-ready grouse
12 slices smoked streaky bacon
4 wooden skewers
500ml sunflower oil, for deep frying
400g Maris piper potatoes, peeled
20g unsalted butter, room temperature
100ml beef stock
300ml chicken stock
200ml red wine
Maldon salt flakes & freshly ground black pepper
A handful of watercress to garnish

Pre-heat the oven to 220ºC/gas mark 7.

Prepare the game chips. Using a sharp knife or mandolin, slice the potatoes as thinly as possible and dry them with a clean tea towel. Pour 6cm of sunflower oil into a medium-sized heavy-bottomed saucepan or deep fat fryer. Heat to 170°C. If using a saucepan, please be careful as the oil will be very hot. Fry the potato slices in the hot oil, stirring to ensure that they don’t stick together. The potato will colour and crisp up. Once cooked, put them onto some kitchen paper to absorb any extra grease and keep warm.

Lightly season the grouse with salt and pepper, and rub the breasts with a little butter. Cover each grouse with 3 slices of bacon and secure with a skewer. Put them into a roasting tin and cook for about 12 minutes. If you insert a sharp knife or carving fork between the legs and breast, a little blood should run out. Pink is the ideal way to serve grouse… otherwise it will be too dry.

While the grouse is cooking, heat up the beef and chicken stocks in a heavy-bottomed saucepan, reducing it by two-thirds. Take the grouse out of the roasting tin and put onto a plate to rest (cover in tin foil to keep warm). Put the roasting tin onto the hob and add the wine. Scape the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon to remove any cooking residue. Reduce completely and add the reduced stock. Simmer for a few minutes, add any residue juices from the grouse, and then strain through a sieve into a small pan. Keep warm.

Serve the grouse whole on individual plates with game chips, chutney, bread sauce and gravy on the side, garnish with watercress.

For the bread sauce
1 onion, peeled and halved
50g unsalted butter
4 cloves
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs of thyme
500ml milk
½ tsp ground nutmeg
100g fresh white breadcrumbs
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

To make the bread sauce, finely chop half the onion and cook it gently until soft in a heavy-bottomed saucepan with half the butter. Stud the other half of the onion with the cloves, pushing them through the bay leaf to anchor it. Put the milk, nutmeg, thyme and studded onion into the saucepan with the cooked onion and bring to the boil. Season and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes.

Remove the saucepan from the heat and leave the sauce to infuse for 30 minutes or so. Take out and discard the studded onion. Add the breadcrumbs and return the saucepan to a low heat. Simmer gently for 10 minutes, giving it an occasional stir. Add the remaining butter. Stir until the sauce has amalgamated; check and correct the seasoning if necessary. Keep warm.

Note: if the sauce is too thick, you can add a little extra milk.

For the plum chutney
1kg red plums, pitted
2 red onions, finely chopped
50ml sunflower oil
200g brown sugar
100ml sherry vinegar
200ml red wine
1 tsp black pepper, cracked
1 tsp black mustard seed
½ tsp mix spice
2 bay leaves
1 red chilli
1 tsp Maldon salt flakes

To make the plum chutney, soften the chopped onions in the oil and cook for about 5 minutes. Add all the spices and herbs to the mix and cook for a minute, then add the vinegar, wine and sugar. Let it cook until it has reduced by half.

Add the fruit and cook for a further 30 minutes. The liquid will evaporate and the mix will thicken. Don’t stir the fruit to much as it will break up.

Once it has thickened and dried, which will happen as the liquid reduces, take off the heat and set aside until needed. Season if required

The Dutchess

This was made for the run up to the Royal Wedding and was originally called the Kate Middleton Royal

25ml Tanqueray Gin
25ml Pinky Vodka
15ml Lillet Blonde/Blanc
10ml crystallized petal mix (bought from specialist shop)
Dash lemon juice
Dash syrup

Glassware – coupe
Garnish – cherry with stem

Put the petal mix, lemon juice and syrup in a mixing glass and muddle to infuse. Add to a cocktail shaker filled with ice along with the remaining spirits. Shake lightly to blend and balance and double strain into a chilled cocktail glass

Balthazar’s grilled sea bass with romesco sauce

Serves 2

1 large whole sea bass 800g (if you cannot find a large sea bass, you could get 2 x 400g). It’s best to get your fish from a reputable fishmonger (then you can be sure of its sustainable credentials) and ask them to butterfly and pin bone it
3 sprigs of thyme, or 6 if you’re using 2 fish
1 lemon
A splash of extra virgin olive oil or a knob of butter for cooking
Maldon salt flakes
Freshly ground black pepper

For the Padrón peppers
100g Padrón peppers
Sunflower oil for cooking
Maldon salt flakes

For the salad
2 x chicory bulbs (preferably 1 red & 1 white), heart removed, then finely sliced
6 sprigs of flat leaf parsley, leaves removed, washed and shaken dry
1 tbsp chives, finely chopped
Juice of ½ lemon
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
Maldon salt flakes

For the romesco sauce
60g hazelnuts, roasted
60g roasted Marcona almonds
125g sun-blushed tomatoes (in oil)
125g piquillo peppers from a tin or jar (rinse with water)
6 cloves garlic
40ml sherry vinegar
125ml grapeseed oil
2 tbsp water
A glug of extra virgin olive oil

Pre heat the oven to 180°C / gas mark 4

To make the romesco sauce, wrap the garlic cloves (unpeeled) in tin foil with a few drops of olive oil and bake until very soft. This should take around 40 minutes. If you like the flavour of roasted garlic, which isn’t strong, then feel free to use more cloves.

Once cooked, squeeze the garlic out of the husk and put into a blender with the the nuts, tomatoes, piquillo peppers and sherry vinegar and blend until smooth, adding enough water to keep the blade moving. Gradually add the grapeseed oil and season with salt, pepper and olive oil. If you don’t end up using all of the sauce, it will freeze easily for another time.

To cook the fish, stuff the fish with thyme and parsley stalks, and season. Lightly score the fish in criss-crosses and brush the skin with a little olive oil (for pan-frying) or butter (for grilling). For pan-frying,heat a non-stick frying pan and fry the fish until golden on both sides. This should take about 6 minutes on each side. For grilling, place the fish on a hot grill pan and cover with butter. Cook for up to 10 to 12 minutes on one side only. The fish is cooked through when you can easily pull the meat away from the bone near the head.

Lightly oil the Padrón peppers and blacken the skins on the grill or griddle pan. Once cooked, sprinkle with salt flakes.

Cut the lemon in half and grill or pan-fry, flesh side down until caramelised (but not burned).

Mix the chives, parsley and chicory in a bowl, drizzle with some olive oil, lemon juice and salt flakes. Serve the fish with the sauce on the side, the grilled lemon half, the blackened Padrón peppers and the salad

Breakfast Negroni

Serves 1

Ingredients
45ml Berto Aperitivo
15ml Beefeater Gin
15ml Campari
10ml Byrrh
1/2 passion fruit
Grapefruit peel to garnish

Method
Add all the ingredients into a cocktail shaker with serveral cubes of ice. Shake hard and double strain into a tumbler with three cubes of ice. Garnish with a sliver of grapefruit

Balthazar’s baked eggs en cocotte, steamed asparagus, Parmesan & thyme-infused cream

Serves 6

 6 medium, free range eggs
300ml double cream
10 sprigs of fresh thyme, leaves picked off and chopped
6 cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed
2 tsp plain flour
2 tsp salted butter
60g fresh Parmesan, grated
60g Gruyère or Comté cheese, grated
250g baby spinach
Pinch of ground nutmeg
Pinch of Maldon salt flakes
1 pack (approx. 350g) asparagus

NB you’ll need 6 ramekins for this recipe

For the garnish
¼ bunch chives, finely chopped
A sprinkle of cayenne pepper
Preheat the oven to 200°C / gas mark 6.

For the Parmesan cream
Add the butter and flour to a heavy-based saucepan and cook for 2 minutes until blended. Add the thyme, garlic and cream, stirring continuously with a wooden spoon to prevent any lumps forming. Bring to the boil and then simmer for two minutes. Add the Parmesan and stir until smooth. If there are some lumps remaining, you can use a blender to finish the job! Season to taste with salt, take off the heat, but keep in the warm pan.

 

For the spinach
To wilt the spinach, wash it with cold water, and drain it by making sure you squeeze out any excess water. Add the spinach to the Parmesan cream and warm through until it has all been incorporated, stirring all the while until it is smooth and creamy. Season with nutmeg, take off the heat, but keep in the warm pan.

For the asparagus
Using a potato peeler, shave the asparagus downwards from beneath the tip to the bottom. Then, depending on how thick the asparagus is, cut off about an inch and a half from the bottom (the thicker the stem is, the more of the “woody” bit from the bottom you’ll have to cull). Put a large pan of salted water on the stove and bring to the boil.  Put the asparagus in to cook for 3 minutes and, assuming it’s soft when you put a knife into it, strain through a colander and then run some cold water over it to prevent it from continuing to cook.  Keep in the colander over the sink until you’re ready to use it.

For the baked eggs
Spoon some hot creamed Parmesan spinach into the bottom of each ramequin, creating a little well in the middle of each. Crack an egg into each, gently spoon the rest of the cream over and sprinkle Gruyère or Comté on top. Bake in the oven for about 6 minutes, until the cheese has melted. Remove from the oven and allow it to cool for 2 minutes. While this is happening, pour some boiling water over the asparagus to warm them up again. Garnish with chopped chives and a sprinkle of cayenne pepper. Lay a couple of asparagus spears over each ramekin for guests to use as soldiers.

Frozen Banana Daiquiri

Ingredients
60ml BACARDI Carta Blanca
25ml fresh lime juice
¼ of banana, muddled
15ml Banana Liqeur
10ml Galliano Float
10ml sugar syrup

Method
Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker and with cubed ice and shake well. Strain and serve over crushed ice in a chilled glass. Garnish with a lime and banana wedge.

Cocchi Spritzer

Ingredients
50ml Cocchi Rose
10ml Ademus Pink Peppercorn Gin
10ml lemon juice
35ml Blanquette (sparkling wine)
splash of Soda Water
Peel of 1 lemon and/or orange

Method
Add all the ingredients except the soda and Blanquette into a cocktail shaker with a few cubes of ice. Shake and strain into a tall glass filled with crushed ice. Top with the Blanquette and a splash of soda. Garnish with a few peels of lemon or orange.

Rabbit & tomato ragù with thyme and shaved courgette pappardelle

Serves 4

5 rabbit legs or a whole rabbit (if you prefer chicken, you can use skinless whole legs instead

1 onion, finely chopped
2 celery sticks, finely chopped
5 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
9 plum tomatoes
250ml light red wine (we use pinot noir)
250ml white wine
400ml chicken stock (good quality stock cubes eg Kallo will do)
1 medium sized, medium strength chilli, finely chopped
100ml extra virgin olive oil
3 large courgettes (approximately 500g)
1 pinch of Maldon salt flakes
1 pinch of freshly ground black pepper
1 small bunch fresh thyme, keep the sprigs whole
1 bay leaf

Preheat the oven to 200°C / gas mark 6.
Halve the plum tomatoes and put them onto a roasting tray. Sprinkle them with olive oil, season and bake for 10 minutes, until they look soft and slightly wilted. Once ready, peel off their skins and discard. Keep the tomatoes and their juice and set aside.

Season the rabbit (or chicken) with salt and pepper. In a heavy bottomed pot, seal the rabbit until it is slightly coloured and then remove it from the pan.

Add the celery, onion, garlic and bay leaf to the now empty pan. Cook them on a medium heat for 5 minutes until they begin to soften and colour slightly. Add the red and white wine and simmer for 7 minutes, or until the wine is reduced by three-quarters. Add the tomatoes, rabbit, 3 sticks of thyme and stock to the mix and cover. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat and simmer for 40 minutes, until the rabbit meat is falling off the bone.

Turn off the heat and discard the thyme and bay leaf. Remove the rabbit from the sauce and simmer the sauce for a further ten to fifteen minutes until it starts to thicken. Make sure you taste it at this point and season if necessary. Pull the rabbit meat off the bone, shred the pieces, and return them to the sauce and stir.

Slice long and even ribbons of courgettes using a mandolin or a potato peeler. If the courgettes are soft and spongy in the middle don’t use the seeds from the centre… use only the firm outer part of the courgettes.

To serve, place the courgette ribbons and rabbit ragù onto a serving dish. Drizzle olive oil over the ribbons and season them with Maldon salt flakes. Garnish with chillies and fresh thyme sprigs. Leave to wilt for 5 minutes and then serve on its own, with crusty bread or fresh tagliatelle.

Vegetable Crudités with Taramasalata

Serves 6

2 Tokyo turnips (available online or in specialist stores)
1 kohlrabi, julienned (available online or in specialist stores)
½ cauliflower, cut into small florets or sliced
1 fennel, halved and julienned
2 sticks of celery
1 bunch of small radishes
40g black olives, pitted
100g cherry tomatoes, halved 

Taramasalata
250g smoked cod roe
4 slices of soft white bread (without the crust)
20ml semi skimmed milk
1 small clove of garlic, peeled and crushed
200ml grapeseed oil
50ml extra virgin olive oil
Pinch of cayenne pepper
Juice of 1 ½ lemon
1 tsp English mustard
Pinch of Maldon salt flakes
Fresh herbs to garnish
Drizzle of extra virgin olive oil to garnish

Method
Break the bread into large pieces. Place them inside a bowl and cover them with milk. Immediately grab the bread with your hands and squeeze most of the milk out.

Place the cod roe, bread and garlic in a blender or food processor and blend on high speed until smooth. Add the grapeseed oil, lemon juice, olive oil, mustard and cayenne pepper to the mixture while stirring it. If the paste is a bit thick, we recommend that you add a little bit of water to it.

Presentation
Spoon the taramasalata onto a plate and place all the vegetables on top of it in an aesthetically pleasing way. Drizzle some olive oil over the vegetables and season with a pinch of Maldon salt flakes. Garnish with fresh herbs and serve.

ROAST SHOULDER OF LAMB WITH LAVENDER HONEY & RED GRAPE MUSTARD

Serves 6

Red grape mustard is only really available online (see Violine de Gretz Mustard on Amazon) and in specialty French delis. If you can’t find it, you could use Dijon mustard.

2.2kg shoulder of lamb, with bone in
1 tbsp piment d’ espelette powder
1 bunch of fresh mint, roughly chopped
2 lemons, unwaxed if possible
100g lavender honey (again, if you’re having difficulty finding this, you can use a floral-scented honey instead)
100g red grape mustard
4 sprigs fresh rosemary, broken into smaller sprigs
10 whole sprigs fresh thyme
3 cloves of garlic, peeled and cut into 4 lengthways
5 carrots, peeled
½ celeriac, peeled and cut into large cubes
3 parsnips, peeled and halved
4 potatoes, peeled and halved
1 fennel bulb, quartered
2 onions, peeled & quartered
200ml extra virgin olive oil
1 litre beef or chicken stock (a good quality stock cube eg Kallo will do)
Maldon salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper

Pre-heat the oven to 200 °C / gas mark 6.

Put the lamb on a board and trim off any excess fat. Create some small holes in the flesh with a knife and insert sprigs of the rosemary and the garlic pieces. Then rub with salt and the piment d’espelette powder on all sides.

Put all the herbs and vegetables into a roasting pan, season with pepper, with the lamb carefully placed on top. Cover generously with olive oil.

Roast in the oven for one hour, until the lamb begins to turn golden. Add the stock to the roasting pan and continue cooking for another hour. If the lamb begins to brown too much, cover with tin foil.

After 2 hours of cooking in total, remove the lamb from the roasting tray, putting the vegetables into an ovenproof dish to keep warm and the unstrained liquor into a heavy bottomed saucepan. Turn the oven down to 140°C / gas mark 1. Place the lamb back into the roasting pan, spread the honey and red grape mustard over the meat and bake for another 40 minutes until the lamb easily comes away from the bone – you may have to cook it a little longer to achieve this. Now put the cooking liquor onto the heat and simmer until it reduces by half. When it’s ready, do not strain it – the small vegetable pieces will help thicken the sauce. Skim the majority of the fat from the top of the liquid (you can leave a little if you like – it adds flavour). Season to taste.

Take the lamb out of the oven and place on a warmed platter surrounded by the roasted vegetables. Squeeze over the lemon juice and sprinkle the chopped mint on top, and serve with the sauce in a warmed jug on the side. The meat can be carved or if you feel like it, you can just tear off chunks.

Mint Sauce (optional)
Small bunch of fresh mint, leaves only, finely chopped
30ml clear honey or golden syrup
90ml white wine vinegar
Whisk all ingredients together and serve.

Rhubarb Soufflé

Serves 4

Butter 4 soufflé moulds or ramekins, dust with caster sugar and place in the fridge.

For the crème anglaise

100g full fat milk
100g double cream
2 egg yolks (you can use both egg whites for the soufflé)
25 g sugar
1 vanilla pod, split in half lengthways

With a whisk mix together the sugar and egg yolks in bowl. In a small saucepan, add the milk, cream and vanilla pod, and bring to the boil while stirring. Pour the warm vanilla cream onto the sugared yolks and whisk together (removing the vanilla pod). Place the full mixture back into the saucepan and whisk on heat, by hand, until it has thickened. The texture should be thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, and should hold its structure when you swipe your finger tip across it. Leave to cool.

For the compote
500g fresh rhubarb, washed and chopped into 1cm pieces
180g caster sugar
1 cardamom seed, crushed
1 vanilla pod, split in half lengthways
2 large oranges, roughly chopped with skin on
125g stewed rhubarb for garnish

Pre heat the oven to 140°C / gas mark 1

Put the rhubarb (discarding the leaves) into a shallow oven-proof dish, along with the oranges, cardamom, vanilla and sugar. Mix well. Cover and place in the oven for 40 minutes (or until the rhubarb is tender). Once cooked, remove from the oven and discard the oranges, vanilla and cardamom. Turn the temperature up to 180°C / gas mark 4. Whilst still hot, set aside around 8 tablespoons (125g) of the compote (stewed rhubarb) for garnish, and blend the rest until completely smooth. Keep to one side.

For the soufflé

215g rhubarb puree (recipe above, any leftover can be frozen or stored in a jar for up to 2 weeks in the fridge)
3 large free range egg whites
65g caster sugar
35g corn flour
A knob of unsalted butter
Caster sugar for dusting 

Mix 3 tablespoons of the purée with 3 tablespoons of corn flour. Place the remaining puréed compote into a large thick-bottomed sauce pan and bring to the boil. As soon as it is boiling, add the corn flour mixture and bring back to the boil, stirring continuously, for a further 2 to 3 minutes, until the mixture has thickened and coats the back of a spoon.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk the egg whites and sugar until soft peaks form. Gently fold the hot rhubarb base into the egg whites with a spatula.

Pre heat the oven to 180°C / gas mark 4.

Remove soufflé dishes/ramekins from the fridge, evenly distribute the mixture and use a spatula to smooth the top of each one. Put in the oven for 8 to 9 minutes (you’ll know they’re cooked when they’re risen and golden brown). Do not open the door while they are cooking!

To serve:

Place the warm stewed rhubarb on top of each soufflé for garnish and serve immediately, with your homemade crème anglaise in a jug alongside.

At Balthazar, we serve with a little crushed shortbread, mixed with crushed pistachio, and sprinkled over the rhubarb on top.

Tip: you could brush the sides of the ramekins with vertical stripes of the rhubarb compote base, before pouring the mixture in, to a colourful affect as it bakes.

Floral Street Cocktail

Serves 6 people

1.5kg beef shoulder (whole feather blade or whole rolled chuck joint)
100g chunk of smoked pancetta
4l cold water
1 bouquet garni (2 bay leaves, 3 sprigs parsley, 4 sprigs thyme)
20 black peppercorns cracked
6 garlic cloves
6 x 2 inch pieces of bone marrow (cut by the butcher)
1 clove
10 juniper berries
Sea salt & freshly ground black pepper

For the vegetables
2 medium leeks, discard green and dice remaining white into 2 inch chunks
4 medium carrots, peeled and cut in half lengthways
3 celery sticks, peeled and cut in half
3 medium turnips, peeled and cut in half (if out of season, use extra carrots)
½ celeriac, peeled and cut into 6 large wedges
200g small shallots
½ Savoy cabbage, cut in to 6 pieces, root left on

Place all the meat into a large heavy-bottomed saucepan. Cover with cold water. Bring slowly to the boil and simmer for 30 minutes, skimming the froth that rises to the surface as you go.

After 30 minutes when the froth has been removed, add the bouquet garni, peppercorns, garlic, clove and juniper berries. Add the vegetables, cover the pot and simmer for about 2 ½ hours, until the meat becomes tender.

During the cooking process, the vegetables will become soft and sweet. Before they disintegrate (after about 1 ½ hours), gently remove them with a slotted spoon and put them into a large ovenproof dish. Cover and keep to one side. Once the meat is cooked, take it out of the liquid and put aside, ready to carve.

Add the bone marrow to the liquid and boil for 5 minutes; remove the bone marrow and set aside with the meat. Check the remaining liquid for seasoning… if it is a bit weak, it can be reduced by boiling for a further 10 minutes and then seasoned. Then add the vegetables and bone marrow back into the liquid and simmer gently for 10 minutes to heat everything through.

To serve, carve the beef into thick slices and place into large bowls with the bone marrow, spooning over the vegetables and liquid.

Chunky tartar sauce is a great accompaniment to this dish.

For the tartar sauce
150ml mayonnaise (homemade is best, but good quality fresh mayonnaise from supermarkets is fine)
30g cornichons, roughly chopped
30g capers, roughly chopped
1 shallot, peeled and roughly chopped
½ small bunch flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped
Juice of ½ lemon
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Fold all of the ingredients together and season.

Food for thought

The traditional serving method for pot au feu is to serve the broth first with a bit of nutmeg and the marrow (if a marrowbone was used) spread on toasted bread. Then the meat and the vegetables are served with coarse salt and strong Dijon mustard, horseradish sauce, and sometimes also with gherkins pickled in vinegar.

Pot-au-feu broth may also be used as a soup (often enriched with rice, pasta or toasted bread), as a base for sauces, or for cooking vegetables or pasta. Ready-to-use concentrated cubes are available to make what purports to be pot-au-feu broth when water is added. This type of broth is often known as a bouillon.

Elderflower Fizz (Mock-tail)

Serves 6 people

1.5kg beef shoulder (whole feather blade or whole rolled chuck joint)
100g chunk of smoked pancetta
4l cold water
1 bouquet garni (2 bay leaves, 3 sprigs parsley, 4 sprigs thyme)
20 black peppercorns cracked
6 garlic cloves
6 x 2 inch pieces of bone marrow (cut by the butcher)
1 clove
10 juniper berries
Sea salt & freshly ground black pepper

For the vegetables
2 medium leeks, discard green and dice remaining white into 2 inch chunks
4 medium carrots, peeled and cut in half lengthways
3 celery sticks, peeled and cut in half
3 medium turnips, peeled and cut in half (if out of season, use extra carrots)
½ celeriac, peeled and cut into 6 large wedges
200g small shallots
½ Savoy cabbage, cut in to 6 pieces, root left on

Place all the meat into a large heavy-bottomed saucepan. Cover with cold water. Bring slowly to the boil and simmer for 30 minutes, skimming the froth that rises to the surface as you go.

After 30 minutes when the froth has been removed, add the bouquet garni, peppercorns, garlic, clove and juniper berries. Add the vegetables, cover the pot and simmer for about 2 ½ hours, until the meat becomes tender.

During the cooking process, the vegetables will become soft and sweet. Before they disintegrate (after about 1 ½ hours), gently remove them with a slotted spoon and put them into a large ovenproof dish. Cover and keep to one side. Once the meat is cooked, take it out of the liquid and put aside, ready to carve.

Add the bone marrow to the liquid and boil for 5 minutes; remove the bone marrow and set aside with the meat. Check the remaining liquid for seasoning… if it is a bit weak, it can be reduced by boiling for a further 10 minutes and then seasoned. Then add the vegetables and bone marrow back into the liquid and simmer gently for 10 minutes to heat everything through.

To serve, carve the beef into thick slices and place into large bowls with the bone marrow, spooning over the vegetables and liquid.

Chunky tartar sauce is a great accompaniment to this dish.

For the tartar sauce
150ml mayonnaise (homemade is best, but good quality fresh mayonnaise from supermarkets is fine)
30g cornichons, roughly chopped
30g capers, roughly chopped
1 shallot, peeled and roughly chopped
½ small bunch flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped
Juice of ½ lemon
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Fold all of the ingredients together and season.

Food for thought

The traditional serving method for pot au feu is to serve the broth first with a bit of nutmeg and the marrow (if a marrowbone was used) spread on toasted bread. Then the meat and the vegetables are served with coarse salt and strong Dijon mustard, horseradish sauce, and sometimes also with gherkins pickled in vinegar.

Pot-au-feu broth may also be used as a soup (often enriched with rice, pasta or toasted bread), as a base for sauces, or for cooking vegetables or pasta. Ready-to-use concentrated cubes are available to make what purports to be pot-au-feu broth when water is added. This type of broth is often known as a bouillon.

Elderflower Fizz (Mock-tail)

Ingredients
25ml Elderflower cordial
15 ml Fresh lime juice
125ml Apple juice (cloudy is best)
Splash of soda

Method
Add the Elderflower Cordial and lime juice into a highball glass and mix gently. Top with cubed ice and poor in the apple juice leaving a little room for a good splash of soda water.  Garnish with a sprig of mint.

Balthazar Mince Pies

Serves 8

For the pastry
180g unsalted butter
115g icing sugar
40g ground almond (almond powder)
3 medium sized free range egg yolks
300g plain flour
Pinch of salt

In an electric stand mixer, using the paddle attachment beat the icing sugar and butter together until smooth. Add the ground almonds, egg yolks and salt to the mixture and sieve in the flour. Mix until smooth. Press the dough into a ball, wrap it with Clingfilm and place it in the fridge to chill for 2 hours.

For the mincemeat filling
2 Granny Smith apples, peeled and cored
30g glacé cherries, halved
1 vanilla pod, cut in half lengthways with the seeds scraped out
Zest of an organic lemon
Zest of an organic orange
125g organic dried cranberries
60g beef suet
90 organic raisins
60g organic currants
60g organic sultanas
30g almonds, flaked
50ml brandy
50ml dark rum
1 tsp Chinese five spice
85g dark brown sugar
60g mixed peel

Whilst the pastry is chilling, make the mincemeat filling. Take a large mixing bowl and grate the apple with a course grater. Add in the orange and lemon zest, cherries and vanilla seeds. Place all the other ingredients into a saucepan and cook on a low heat for around 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Once the mixture begins to turn sticky and caramelised, turn off the heat and allow cooling.

Grease a baking tray and line it with parchment paper then butter eight indents of 8cm in diameter with butter. Take the pasty out of the fridge and roll out to 2mm thick, using as little flour as possible. Cut 8 rings of 10cm each using a round pastry cutter and line the rings with the pastry using both hands, one to push down the pastry on hand to turn the ring until the pastry reach the bottom corner and up to the top of the ring

Cut another 8 rings of 8 cm (they will be use for the top, then cut 8 snowflakes with a cutter, leave the line tart on the baking tray and the top and the leaves onto a tray for later on baking paper and store them in the fridge.

Pre-heat the oven at 160°C / gas mark 5.

Once the filling is cool, fill the pastry rings to the top with the mincemeat mix and place the 8mm pastry ring on top to seal. Press down the edges with a fork to make them look prettier.

Set aside in the fridge again for 30 minutes or until ready to cook.

Cook the mince pies for 15 minutes until the pastry is golden brown… if you need to cook for a further 5 minutes, cover with foil so that they don’t burn.

When you take the mince pies out of the oven, remove them immediately from the baking tray, taking care, because they will be hot, and pop them onto a baking tray to cool down. Sprinkle with icing sugar and serve with brandy cream, clotted cream or brandy butter.

TWICE BAKED BEAUFORT SOUFFLÉ WITH ROASTED BEETROOT AND TOASTED HAZELNUT

6 people

For the soufflé
200ml organic semi-skimmed milk
25g plain flour
25g unsalted butter
70g Beaufort cheese, grated
30g Parmesan cheese, grated
1 bay leaf
3 small cloves
3 medium free-range egg yolks
4 medium free-range egg whites
Pinch of nutmeg
Pinch of Maldon salt flakes
Pinch of Piment d’Espelette

For the salad
6 organic cooked beetroots
100g hazelnut, roasted and served whole
30g baby watercress

Put the milk into a saucepan on a low heat and add the nutmeg, cloves and bay leaf. Allow to warm for a few minutes but do not boil. Heat the butter gently in another saucepan. Once softened, slowly incorporate the flour bit by bit stirring well as to form a paste. Once warm, take the milk off the heat, sieve it and add the liquid little by little into the flour and butter mix, while whisking vigorously. Once all the milk is mixed in, bring to the boil and whisk continuously until the mixture becomes smooth and thick. This will only take a few minutes. Then, take the saucepan off the heat and add the Parmesan and Beaufort into the white sauce, whisking until the cheese is completely melted.

Pre-heat the oven to 180°C / gas mark 4.

Pour the soufflé base into a bowl and cover with Cling film to prevent a skin from forming. Allow it to cool to room temperature. Once cool, stir in the three egg yolks. Now, whisk the egg whites to a stiff peak. Fold in the egg whites slowly and gently with a large spoon metal? Make sure not to stir, as it will just deflate the egg whites.

Once combined, spoon the mix into 6 buttered soufflé moulds (175ml each) or large ramekins. Put the moulds onto a baking tray and bake for about 6 minutes. Once the soufflés begins to rise turn the oven down to 150°C / gas mark 2 for another 6 minutes. They will continue to rise slowly. The soufflés can be served once cooked but can also be put aside for a few hours. Simply reheat them in their moulds for 8 minutes (160°C / gas mark 3), and they will rise up again.

Serve with a side of roasted beetroot, watercress and hazelnuts all seasoned with a hazelnut dressing (recipe below).

For the hazelnut dressing
100ml hazelnut oil
100ml sunflower oil
80ml red wine vinegar
1 tbsp water
1 tbsp runny honey
Pinch of Maldon salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper

Combine all ingredients together in a bowl using a whisk

Gingerbread Fizz Cocktail

35ml Mette Pain d’Epices
15ml Cariel Vanilla Vodka
10ml Mette Gingembre Spirit
25ml lemon juice
10ml sugar syrup
15ml pasteurised egg white
Splash of soda water

Method
Add all the ingredients except the soda water into an iced cocktail shaker. Shake hard and pour contents directly into a high ball glass. Top with soda slowly to create the meringue top.

Tarte flambée

Serves 4

For the dough
500ml lukewarm water
30g dried yeast
60ml extra virgin olive oil
1kg strong white flour
1 tbsp table salt

For the topping
300g smoked bacon lardons
2 small onions, thinly sliced into circles
400g crème fraîche

For the garnish
1 tsp piment d’Espelette powder (available in specialist stores or online)
A drizzle of rapeseed oil
A medium bunch chives, finely chopped
Maldon salt flakes

Preheat the oven to 250°C / gas mark 5.
You can make the dough by hand, but if you have a dough hook on your Kenwood or KitchenAid, this method is easier. This recipe uses the latter method. Add the yeast to the water, and whisk for a few minutes. Allow the yeast to dissolve. Then add in the olive oil and set aside for 5 minutes while the yeast activates. Place the salt and flour into the mixing bowl and make a hole in the middle. Pour the yeast liquid into the hole and mix with the dough hook for about 5 minutes on a medium speed, until the blend looks smooth.Cover the dough with a clean tea towel and let it rest for approximately 30 minutes to allow it to rise.
Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces. Take a floured rolling pin and roll each portion into a circular shape around 2mm thick. Put the 4 pieces well-spaced out onto a floured baking tray.
Spread the crème fraîche equally onto the 4 bases and sprinkle each with the sliced raw onions and the smoked bacon lardons.
Place in the pre-heated oven at 250°C / gas mark 5 for 5 to 10 minutes, depending on how crisp and dark you like your dough.
Remove from the oven and sprinkle with chopped chives, a few salt flakes (but be careful, because the lardons will be salty), a small pinch of piment d’Espelette and a drizzle of rapeseed oil.
Serve immediately.

Frightening Fizz Cocktail

35ml Briotte Dark Crème de Cacao
15ml Briotte Green Crème de Menthe
25ml Bailey’s
One egg white
200ml soda water
10ml grenadine

Drizzle the inside of a high ball glass with the grenadine and set aside. Add all ingredients except the soda water into a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake hard and pour into the coated glass. Carefully add a splash of the soda water to create a foam, leave for 10 seconds and add the rest encourage more frothing. Serve immediately.

Sea bass en croûte de sel

Serves 2

1 whole sea bass (or sea bream), gutted with scales intact
1.5 kg sea salt
5 free range or organic egg whites
1 ½ lemons
1 bunch fresh thyme (approx. 20g)
1 bunch fresh rosemary (approx. 20g)

Preheat the oven to 180°C / gas mark 4.

Wash the fish inside and out with cold water and pat dry with kitchen roll. Cut one lemon into thick slices and put inside the fish cavity along with the rosemary and thyme.

In a large bowl, mix together the egg whites and sea salt with your hands (be careful to cover any wounds on your fingers as the salt will hurt!).

Layer a third of the salt mix onto a baking tray to form a thin layer. Place the stuffed fish on top. Then cover the fish with the remaining salt mix and press down firmly until you can no longer see any of the skin. It is very important that no fish can be seen through the salt.

Place in the oven for 30 minutes.

Take the fish out of the oven and allow to cool for 5 minutes. Then carefully pull away the salt from the fish with a knife (it will be very hard but once cracked should pull away easily).

Put the fish onto a serving dish and squeeze the other half lemon over the top. This dish is perfect with a heritage tomato and shallot salad or seasonal vegetables.

 

HIGH SUMMER SPRITZ

35ml  Audemus Pink Peppercorn Gin
25ml Mondino Amaro
15ml freshly-squeezed pink grapefruit juice
50ml Blanquette (or good quality sparkling wine)
Club soda
Dash of Maraschino syrup (from a jar of cherries)
Garnish: grapefruit peel, Maraschino cherry and orange segment

Fill a large wine glass with cubed ice and add all the ingredients minus the soda. Fill the glass up with soda and garnish with the fruit. Serve immediately.

THE BALTHAZAR 4TH JULY HOT DOG

For the BBQ Beef Brisket

Serves 12

1kg beef brisket
2 heaped tsp dried coriander
2 heaped tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 heaped tsp allspice
10 cloves garlic
5 star anise
Pinch of Maldon salt flakes
250ml dry white wine
2 bay leaves
10 sprigs of fresh thyme with the leaves picked off
150ml smokey BBQ sauce (available at all supermarkets – we hear that The Bay Tree and Jack Daniel’s rate the highest with theirs)
Sunflower oil for cooking

Add a splash of oil to a large frying pan and, when smoking, seal the whole brisket joint on all sides. Be careful when putting the joint into the pan… the hot oil will splash. Once sealed, put the joint onto a large piece of tin foil inside a roasting tray. Mix all the other ingredients in a bowl and coat the joint with the mixture, ensuring that everything remains within the tin foil. Then, carefully wrap the foil around the joint, ensuring that you completely cover it and seal all openings. Add another sheet, just to ensure that there is no chance that the liquid escapes and evaporates!

Pre heat the oven to 110°C / gas mark ¼. NB If your oven can go lower, we recommend cooking the brisket for 12 hours at 85°C. If it doesn’t, then cook at 110°C / gas mark ¼ for 8 hours (overnight).

When cooked, take the meat out and allow it to cool. It will have shrunk by nearly a half and there will be large amount of excess liquid from the meat; this is normal.

Discard the cooking liquid and place the joint on a board, cutting it into small thumb-sized cubes. Transfer these to a bowl and stir in the smoky BBQ sauce (we use our own secret recipe!). Taste and add more if you feel it needs it.

To make the Hot Dog

Serves 1

1 slice of Comté cheese
A hot dog style brioche roll
8’’ Toulouse sausage (available on Ocado and leading supermarkets) or Frankfurter
10 shallots, finely sliced into thin rings
Plain flour & corn flour for dusting
Sunflower oil for cooking
Maldon salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper

Pour 6cm oil into medium-sized heavy-bottomed saucepan or use a deep-fat fryer. Heat to 160°C. If using a saucepan, please be careful as the oil will be very hot. Carefully dust the shallot rings in a mixture of plain and corn flour. Shake off any excess and then fry until golden brown. Remove them with tongs and place onto kitchen paper to soak up excess oil.  Season.

Cook the sausage (either grill or fry) and put into the brioche bun. Top with the braised beef brisket and then the cheese. Put under a hot grill to melt the cheese. Sprinkle with the crisp-fried onions and serve immediately.

Bloody Mary ‘For a Crowd’

Ingredients

 2 ltrs good quality tomato juice
200ml Sipsmith Sipping Vodka
150ml of Worcestershire sauce
1½ heaped tbsp fresh horseradish
100ml Tabasco mild green pepper sauce
Juice of 1 lemon
Juice of 1 lime
5 generous pinches of celery seeds crushed between fingers (available to buy in all good supermarkets)

To make the cocktail

In a large vessel (bowl, jug or pan), add the crushed celery seeds, then the Tabasco, lemon and lime juice, Worcestershire sauce, vodka and tomato juice. Finely grate the horseradish and mix with all the other ingredients. Stir well. Pour into a 2 litre cocktail jug and chill in the fridge for an hour before serving.

Poached Egg, Roast Tomato, Quinoa & Spinach Salad

Serves 6

6 medium Burford Brown eggs (or any other free-range high quality eggs)
200g quinoa
350g cherry tomatoes
1 tbsp Tabasco
4 tbsp olive oil
3 tbsp white wine vinegar
12 rashers of streaky bacon
2 avocados, split into quarters and chopped
150g baby spinach, washed and dried
50g sunflower seeds
50g linseeds
50g pumpkin seeds

For the dressing:

50ml balsamic vinegar
2 tsp Dijon mustard
150ml olive oil
Pinch of salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method:

Place the quinoa into a pan or bowl and pour in enough boiling water to cover the eggs, add a pinch of salt and cook for 12 minutes. Drain the remaining water, set to one side and keep warm.

Preheat the oven to 160°C / gas mark 4. Place the bacon onto a baking tray cook for 15 minutes or until golden and crisp. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.

Add all the seeds to a frying pan with a splash of olive oil and toast lightly for 2 minutes on a low heat. Add a pinch of salt and set aside.

Sauté the tomatoes in a pan over a medium heat with a pinch of salt and olive oil. Once soft and the juices begin to seep out of the tomatoes add the Tabasco. Remove from the heat and set to one side.

Place the balsamic vinegar and mustard in a bowl. Gradually pour in the olive oil and whisk until the mixture thickens. Season with salt and pepper.

Mix the dressing into the warm quinoa and add the spinach and three-quarters of the seed mix. Divide this mix into six salad bowls and divide the tomatoes and avocado equally between the bowls. Evenly crush the bacon on top of each portion

Place a large saucepan of boiling water on a low heat with the white wine vinegar. When the water begins to simmer, stir with a large spoon and gently drop the eggs one at a time into the pan. Cook for 4 minutes.

Remove the eggs with a slotted spoon and place one on top of each salad. Sprinkle each egg with a teaspoon of the remaining seed mix, a little salt and a splash of olive oil.

Serve immediately.

June Julep

Ingredients
60ml Courvoisier Exclusif Cognac*
4-5 large mint leaves
1 teaspoon of caster sugar
15ml dark rum
25ml water
Garnish  - tablespoon of icing sugar and a blackberry

Method
Add the sugar and water to a tumbler and stir to form a syrup. Add the mint leaves to the glass and lightly crush/bruise the leaves to infuse the syrup. Top with crushed ice and add the remaining ingredients.Mix lightly to blend the cocktail together. Add a touch more ice and garnish with 2-3 mint leaves and a blackberry. Dust with icing sugar sugar and a splash of dark rum for good measure!

* This can also be made with Bourbon, Rye or Peach liqueur.

Nettle Agnolotti

Serves 4

Agnolottis are little rectangular pasta parcels with crimped edges, however this recipe could also be used to make simpler ravioli parcels

For the pasta dough
600g pasta flour
6 large free-range eggs
Pinch of salt

Mix all ingredients in a food processor until bound together and a smooth dough is formed.  Cover the dough in clingfilm and leave it to rest for an hour in the fridge.

The filling:
500g nettles, picked and washed (use gloves to do this).You can always use spinach if nettles are not available

125g ricotta
½ onion, finely chopped
1½ garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 tsp, Piment d’Espelette powder
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
Pinch of nutmeg
Sea salt & freshly ground black pepper

The sauce:
30 g butter
Zest of ½ lemon
75g smoked bacon lardons
½ garlic clove, crushed
50g pine nuts (toasted)
50g cherry tomatoes, quartered
Handful of rocket, to garnish
½ tsp, Piment d’Espelette powder

Method:

Sweat the onions and garlic on a low heat for 5 minutes. Add the Piment d’Espelette powder, pepper, salt, lemon juice and zest. Set aside to cool.

Blanche the nettles (or spinach) in a pan of salted boiling water and cook for 2 minutes. The nettles should feel soft and lose their sting.

Immediately place the nettles into a bowl of cold water to stop them cooking further and then drain. Squeeze as much water out of the leaves as possible.

Place the drained nettles into a food processer with the onions and garlic. Blitz the mix together until broken down and smooth.

Mix the nettle puree with the ricotta cheese. Add lemon juice, salt and a pinch of nutmeg. Place to one side.
Put the dough through a pasta machine until you have two thin sheets, approximately 1mm thick, 30 cm long and 6 cm wide. Keep dusting with flour to ensure the dough doesn’t stick.
Pipe the nettle mix in a straight line (roughly 5cm apart), horizontally along the sheet of pasta. Brush the dough adjacent to the filling (on both sides) lightly with egg wash. Press firmly to seal and fold the pasta over the filling, pressing out any air trapped inside by pinching around the outside carefully with your thumbs (otherwise they will burst when cooked).
Using a fluted pastry wheel, place on a sheet of floured clingfilm laid on a baking tray and set them aside until ready to cook.
For the sauce:
Heat the butter in a large frying pan. Add the bacon lardons, pine nuts and garlic and cook until they begin to colour. Then add the lemon juice and tomatoes and remove the pan from the heat.
Drop the pasta parcels into a pan of salted boiling water for about 3 minutes. When they float to the surface, take off the heat and drain.
Add the pasta parcels to the frying pan and gently toss in the sauce, coating them gently. Fold in the rocket and sprinkle with fresh lemon zest. Serve immediately.

Tip & Dry

Serves 1

50ml Regal Rogue Dry
15ml White Port Taylor’s Chip Dry
Topped with tonic water
Strip of lemon & orange peel to garnish

Put all ingredients into a high ball glass with 3 ice cubes, stir gently and top with the tonic water. Garnish with a slither of orange and lemon peel.

Built in the glass
Highball
Orange and lemon zest

Rhubarb Gin Fizz

35ml Beefeater gin
11ml rhubarb syrup
10ml lemon juice
5ml gomme syrup
15ml pasteurised egg white
Soda to finish

Put all ingredients into an iced cocktail shaker and shake hard until a froth forms. Strain into a high ball glass with 3 ice cubes and top with soda.

 

Salad of Tokyo turnips, fennel, golden beetroot and monk’s beard

Serves 4 as a starter or a side salad

5 Tokyo turnips (or baby sweet turnips), peeled
1 golden beetroot, peeled
1 medium sized fennel bulb
A handful of monk’s beard, trimmed at the roots and cut into approx. 5cm pieces
1 small bunch chives, finely chopped
2 blood oranges, peeled and segmented
Zest of one blood orange
100ml extra virgin olive oil
Maldon salt flakes

Cut the turnips in half widthways and into half-moon slices about 3mm thick; do the same with the beetroot, except that you need to slice it more thinly, as it is tougher.

Wash the fennel and remove the course outer layer. Cut the bulb in half, lengthways and slice across the grain into pieces about 3mm thick.

Mix the turnips, fennel, beetroot, chives and the monks beard together in a large salad bowl. Gently fold in the orange segments. Garnish with blood orange zest and dress with a generous glug of olive oil and a generous helping of salt flakes (rock salt would be too coarse).

This salad should be eaten as soon as it is dressed before the salt dissolves completely.

Milano Mule Cocktail

Makes 12 doughnuts

For the starter
245g strong white flour
450ml whole milk
90g dried yeast

For the dough
495g strong white flour
4 large free range egg yolks
200g caster sugar
150g unsalted butter, softened
Sunflower oil for deep frying

For the starter, put the milk and yeast into a mixing bowl and whisk together. Then sieve in the flour gradually whilst mixing, until a smooth paste is formed. Cover the bowl with Clingfilm and leave in a warm place for 30 minutes to ferment.

Put the sugar and egg yolks into another mixing bowl (ensure it’s heat-proof eg Pyrex) and put this on top of a saucepan of boiling water. Whisk until it becomes light and fluffy (should take around 5 minutes). Remove from the heat and keep to one side.

To make the dough, place the flour, salt and “starter” mixture in a large mixing bowl. Begin to mix on a low speed then add the egg yolk and sugar mix. Turn up the speed and mix until the dough is smooth, elastic and coming away from the sides of the bowl. Add the butter and beat until incorporated.

Place the dough mixture into a clean greased bowl and cover with Clingfilm. Put into the fridge for at least one hour (more if possible) before dividing into 80g pieces and rolling into balls (approximately the size of a tennis ball). Put each ball, well spaced out, onto a clean tray and leave in a warm place to prove for around 2 hours or until they have almost doubled in size.

You don’t have to use a deep fat fryer for the doughnuts, but if you don’t, please be extra careful with the hot oil. Pour approximately 6cm of oil into a large, heavy bottomed saucepan. Heat to 160°C and fry the doughnuts for approximately 20 minutes or until golden brown… you’ll have to do this in batches. Be sure to turn them regularly with tongues to keep an even colour. Remove and place on kitchen paper to soak up any excess oil.

Rhubarb Jam  - Yield is 4 x 450g regular pots of jam
1kg pink rhubarb, trimmed
1kg jam sugar (which contains added pectin)
Zest and juice of one lemon
50g stem or crystallized ginger, finely chopped
4cm piece of fresh ginger, peeled

Wash the rhubarb and slice into 2cm pieces. Tip into a large ceramic or plastic bowl and add the jam sugar, lemon zest and juice and the stem ginger. Then, finely grate the peeled ginger directly into the bowl. Stir the mixture thoroughly, cover loosely with Clingfilm and leave to one side to rest for approximately 2 hours (this will allow the sugar to dissolve into the rhubarb juices). You may need to stir the mixture occasionally. Scoop the fruit and all the sugary juices into a saucepan and put onto a medium heat. Stir until the sugar has completely dissolved, and then bring to the boil. Continue to cook at a swift pace until the rhubarb is tender and the conserve has reached setting point – this should take about 10 to 15 minutes. [To test for a set, drop ½ tsp of the jam mix onto a cold saucer, leave it for 30 seconds and gently push it with the tip of your finger. If the jam wrinkles the setting point has been reached. If not, continue to cook for a further couple of minutes and test again.] Remove the saucepan from the heat and leave to one side for 2-3 mins before pouring into sterilized jars. Seal immediately and label with the date. NB this has a shelf life of 3 months (store in a cool dry place).

Custard - Yield is 500g
500ml whole milk
1 vanilla pod
4 large free range egg yolks
100g caster sugar
60g corn flour
2 tsp plain flour

Slice the vanilla pod in half lengthways and scrape out the seeds. Put the remaining pod, seeds and milk into a saucepan and bring to the boil. In another bowl, whisk together the egg yolks and caster sugar until smooth and light. Add the corn flour and the flour and whisk again until all is combined. Once the milk is boiling, strain gradually through a sieve into the flour, sugar and egg yolk mixture and whisk until incorporated. Pour back into the pan and whisk continuously over the heat until the mixture becomes thick. It should coat the back of a spoon. Pour the custard into a cool bowl and cover with Clingfilm. Leave to cool.

To assemble the doughnuts… Using a small sharp knife poke a hole in the side of the doughnut going through to the middle. Put the rhubarb jam and custard into separate piping bags. Pipe the rhubarb jam into the centre of the doughnut followed by the custard. Roll the doughnuts in caster sugar. Serve immediately and enjoy!

Chasing Rainbows cocktail

Try our Matthew Williamson inspired cocktail at home…

Ingredients
25ml Pinky Vodka
10ml Lillet Blanc
5ml Yellow Chartreuse
2-3 crystallised rose petals
Squeeze of lime
150ml Brut Champagne

Method
Gently crush the rose petals in a cocktail shaker with a muddler then add the Pinky, Lillet and Chartreuse. Fill with ice and stir. Add a squeeze of lime and shake to mix. Finally, strain the mixture into a champagne glass and top with Champagne. Garnish with 2-3 crystallised violet petals.

Galette du Roi Cake

Serves 6-8

500g puff pastry (good quality pastry from a supermarket is fine – any you don’t use can be frozen)
100g unsalted butter
100 g caster sugar
100g almond flour (available from all good supermarkets)
2 large free range eggs
70g ground almonds
3 drops almond essence
25ml pouring cream
10g plain flour
Egg wash (1 egg with an extra 1 egg yolk whisked together with a fork)

Roll out the pastry to approximately 5mm thick and cut two circular discs 20cm wide using a plate or a dish if one does not have a pastry cutter. Cover with clingfilm and put in the fridge to rest for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a large bowl beat together the butter and sugar until it becomes pale and smooth. Add the almond flour and mix again until smooth. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix well.

Take the first ‘disc’ of puff pastry and place on a baking tray lined with baking paper.

Smooth the almond filling on top of the pastry leaving a 1cm-2cm border. Brush the border with the egg wash. Place the second disk of puff pastry on top. Gently press the edges of the two discs together with your fingers to close the galette. Brush the top of pastry with the remaining egg wash.

Finally score the edges of the galette with the back of a small knife to create an attractive pattern (feel free to be creative but be careful not to pierce the pastry). Then place in the fridge to rest for at least 2 hours.

Preheat the oven to 160°C / gas mark 4 and bake for 45 minutes. Leave to cool on a wire rack before serving.

Orange Julius Mocktail

Serves 1

Recipe

25ml Coco Lopez
15ml lime juice
75ml cranberry juice
100ml orange juice
A glacécherry to garnish

To make the cocktail

Add all the ingredients into a cocktail shaker with a handful of cubed ice. Shake hard and strain the liquid into a chilled highball glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish with orange peel and a glacé cherry.

Gin Fizz

Serves 1

50ml Beefeatergin
25ml lemon juice
25ml gomme syrup
1 small free range egg white
3 drops of orange blossom water
Top up with soda water

Add all the ingredients except the soda water to a cocktail shaker with a handful of cubed ice. Shake hard for about 1 minute until a froth begins to form. Strain into a high ball with 4 ice cubes and top with soda slowly to form a meringue-like texture

Balthazar’s roast goose with cider

Serves 6

4-5kg goose (giblets removed but retained)
400ml cider (medium-dry)
3 carrots, peeled, toped and tailed
3 onions, peeled and halved
1 bulb of garlic – each clove should be peeled and halved
1 apple, cored, peeled and roughly chopped
¼ tsp ground cloves
½ tsp ground all spice
Zest of one orange
Sea salt & freshly ground black pepper

Mix the cloves, allspice, orange zest and a good grind of salt & pepper together in a bowl. Take half and massage into the goose both inside and out. Leave to marinade in the fridge overnight, but keep the bird uncovered. Next morning remove from the fridge and wipe the bird dry, prick the skin with a sharp knife and rub with the remaining seasoning.

Pre heat your oven to 190°C / gas mark 5.

Put the carrots, onions, garlic, apple and goose giblets into a roasting tray and sit the bird on top. Place into the oven on the middle shelf and roast for an hour and a half. If the goose begins to colour too much, cover with a layer of foil.

Take out of the oven, carefully remove the vegetables from under the goose and set to one side – they should be soft and caramelised. Leave the giblets with the bird. Drain the goose fat from the tray and set aside (this can be used to roast potatoes if required).

Crush the roasted vegetables, garlic and apple with a fork until it forms a purée – add a little of the goose fat to loosen if needed.  Season with salt and pepper and set to one side.

Reduce the oven temperature to 160°C / gas mark 3.

Add the cider into the pan and place the bird back into the oven, still with the giblets. After an hour of cooking, take the goose out of the oven, remove from the roasting tray and pour off the excess fat. Put the bird back into the oven, with giblets intact, and cook for a further 30 minutes. Remove the bird and set aside to rest for 10 minutes.

To make the jus, add 125ml water to the roasting pan and mix around with a wooden spoon until all the sticky bits have come off the bottom of the pan. Put the pan onto a low heat, and gently simmer for 5 minutes or until all the sticky bits are dissolved. Strain the liquid through a course sieve and skim off the grease from the top with a spoon. Season with salt and pepper.

Just before you’re ready to serve, warm through the roast vegetable purée in a saucepan. Then tear the goose flesh off the bone or carve it delicately – whichever you prefer. Place the meat on a plate with the warm roast vegetable purée and a spoon of the jus. We would serve this at Balthazar with Brussels sprouts and roast potatoes.

Gingerbread Sour Cocktail

35ml Mette Pain E’spices
15ml Cariel Vanilla Vodka
10ml Mette Gingembre Spirit
25ml lemon juice
15ml sugar syrup
15ml pasteurised egg white (optional)

NB: You can substitute ginger syrup and King’s Ginger liqueur for the Mette if unavailable but stick to the measures suggested

To make the cocktail
Add all the ingredients into a cocktail shaker with a handful of cubed ice. Shake hard and strain the liquid into a chilled martini glass. Serve straight up and garnish with a ginger biscuit on the side.

Pumpkin Soufflé

Serves 8

1kg fresh pumpkin, skin-on, de-seeded and chopped into 2cm chunks (you should end up with around 750g of cooked pumpkin without the skin or the seeds!)
40ml whipping cream
50g corn flour
11 medium-sized free range eggs, whites only
250g caster sugar
A generous knob of unsalted butter, softened

To serve
150g pecan nuts
A pot of pouring or single cream

For the vanilla syrup
20ml water
20ml caster sugar
1 vanilla pod, split and scrape the seeds out and added to the liquid

Put the water, sugar and vanilla pod into a small saucepan and bring to the boil and ensure that all the sugar is all dissolved before taking off the heat and allowing to cool.  When ready to use, remove the pod (and when it’s dry, you can use it to infuse sugar or jam).

Pre heat the oven to 140°C / gas mark 1.

Lay the pecan nuts onto a baking tray and cook for 10 minutes, being careful not to burn. Allow to cool and then chop finely.

Turn the heat up to 170°C / gas mark 3.

Put the pumpkin pieces onto a baking tray, cover with tin foil and bake on the middle shelf for 45 minutes until soft. Remove from the oven. Whilst still hot, taking care not to burn yourself, peel the skin from the pumpkin and discard. Put the pumpkin flesh into a blender and blitz until smooth. Add the vanilla syrup and whipping cream and blend again until well mixed.

Prepare the ramekins (soufflé moulds) (approximately 10cm in diameter) beforehand, because timing is of the essence. Generously brush them with butter and then dust with caster sugar, before tapping off any excess sugar. Place on a baking tray.

Place 100ml (approximately 7 tablespoons) of the purée into a mixing bowl and add the corn flour and mix well to form a paste. Place the mixture into a large heavy-bottomed sauce pan and add the remaining pumpkin purée from the liquidiser. Slowly bring to the boil, stirring constantly until smooth and shiny. This should take about 5 minutes. Then, set aside but don’t allow to cool as the base need to be hot for the meringue to incorporated!

In a large mixing bowl, whisk the egg whites and gradually add the sugar. Keep whisking until stiff peaks are formed… the mixture should have a firm and smooth texture. Take a third of the meringue mix and whisk into the pumpkin purée to loosen it up to start with. Then, gently fold the rest of the meringue into the mixture using a large metal spoon, forming a smooth light mixture. Divide the mixture into the ramekins, smoothing over the top with the back of a spoon so that the mixture is flush with the ramekins.

Turn the oven up again to 180°C / gas mark 4.

Keeping the ramekins on the baking tray, cook on the middle shelf of the oven for 10 minutes. The soufflés should rise to be a third higher than the moulds. Scatter each soufflé with chopped pecans and serve immediately with pouring cream.

Dressed Burrata, heirloom tomatoes, toasted hazelnuts and basil

This dish could be served individually or on a larger platter to share with friends. If possible, try to use a variety of tomatoes. Different colours and tastes will create a more interesting dish.

Serves 4
2x 200g balls of Burrata
50g hazelnuts
5 large ripe tomatoes
For the dressing
1 tsp soft dark brown sugar
1 tbsp sherry vinegar
3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1tbsp balsamic vinegar
¼ bunch of fresh basil (normal sized)
Sea salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper (to taste)

Wash and chop the tomatoes into bite-sized chunks, put them into a mixing bowl and coat them in the olive oil and sherry vinegar. Season with sugar and a pinch of sea salt flakes and leave to marinate for five minutes.

If serving sharing-style spread the tomatoes out on a serving platter or divide them between four plates if serving individually.

Tear the Buratta balls in half and place on top of the tomatoes (or a piece on each plate). Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and black pepper. Tear the basil leaves and scatter over the salad.

Pre-heat the grill to a medium temperature, roughly chop the nuts and lightly toast on a baking tray. Be careful not to burn. Once warm, sprinkle the nuts and drizzle the balsamic vinegar over the salad and serve immediately.

Pea and Girolle Risotto with Roasted Salted Marcona Almonds

Serves 4

For the risotto
1 medium sized onion, peeled and finely chopped
1 clove of garlic, peeled and finely chopped
50g unsalted butter
200g Arborio rice
100ml dry white wine
500ml hot chicken or vegetable stock (good quality stock cube are fine to use)
100g fresh peas, podded
100g frozen petits pois
50g Parmesan, grated
3 tbsp mascarpone
30g Marcona almonds, salted and roasted
50g pea shoots
4 large fresh mint leaves, roughly torn

For the girolles
120g fresh girolles, cleaned and split in two
1tbsp unsalted butter
1 shallot, finely chopped
1 small clove of garlic, peeled and crushed
Maldon salt & freshly ground black pepper

Warm the butter in a heavy-bottomed frying pan. Once it begins to froth (but not burn), add the shallots and garlic and cook for a couple of minutes until soft. Add the girolles and sauté for 1-2 minutes. Season and put aside put aside in a bowl along with their juice.

To make the risotto, heat 50g of the butter in a heavy-bottomed saucepan and add the onion and garlic. Cook for a couple of minutes on a low heat until soft. Add the petits pois, crushing them a little. Add the rice, stirring gently until all the butter is absorbed. Season and add the white wine, stirring all the while. Continue to cook until all the liquid is absorbed. Then add half the stock simmer and stir until the stock is absorbed. Slowly add the rest of the stock, continually stirring. When the rice is almost cooked, after 14 minutes, stir in the fresh peas for a minute. Sprinkle the Parmesan over the rice and let it stand for a minute; then add the mascarpone, stirring it in gently. The rice should be velvety and soft at this point. If not, add a little more stock.

Spoon the risotto into 4 warm bowls. Then add the warm girolles and almonds and garnish with pea shoots and mint.

 

Strawberry Cheesecake

Serves 8

Ingredients: 

For the base
150g digestive biscuits
50g unsalted butter
Light oil or butter for greasing
50g strawberry jam

Preheat the oven to 150°C / gas mark 2

Crush the digestive biscuits in a sealed plastic bag so as not to lose any crumbs. Melt the butter in a saucepan. Add the crushed biscuits and stir well. Remove from the heat. Grease a 20cm (8”) springform cake tin with light oil or butter. Spread the biscuit mix into the base of the tin and press down firmly. Bake in the oven for approximately 12 minutes. Remove, allow to cool and then chill in the fridge for half an hour.

Take the biscuit base out of the fridge and spread a thin layer of strawberry jam on the top.

Once the biscuit base has cooked, turn the oven down to 110°C / gas mark ¼ ) to cook the cheesecake slowly. By cooking it at this temperature, the cheesecake will remain smooth and creamy.

For the cheesecake
350g cream cheese
125g caster sugar
6 free range medium sized egg yolks
2 free range medium sized eggs
350g double cream 1 vanilla pod (cut in half lengthways with seeds scraped out from both sides)
100g strawberries to decorate

In a bowl or food processor, whisk cream cheese, sugar and vanilla seeds until smooth. Gradually add the egg yolks, eggs and double cream and mix until completely smooth. Remove the base from the fridge and spoon the mixture on top. Bake for 45 minutes or until set. Remove from oven and leave to cool, before removing the cheesecake from the tin.

Decorate with the fresh strawberries.

 

Warm English Asparagus, Morels & Confited Egg Yolk with Bacon Vinaigrette

Serves 4

Ingredients
4 Burford Brown egg yolks, confited (see method below)
100ml sunflower oil (you may need a little more, depending on the size of your bain marie)
16 spears of green asparagus, scraped, washed and with ends trimmed
80g fresh morels, washed and dried with kitchen paper
1 banana shallot, finely chopped
1 spring onion, finely sliced
1 clove of garlic, peeled and crushed
2 medium sized tomatoes, diced into very small pieces (skin them first using boiling water if possible)
25ml sherry vinegar
50ml extra virgin olive oil
6 rashers of smoked streaky bacon, cooked until crispy and then broken up (keep the fat for the vinaigrette)
A pinch of smoked paprika
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

To confit the egg yolks
Put the egg yolks into a heatproof bowl and cover with the sunflower oil. Put the bowl over a saucepan filled with water and simmer for around 45 minutes. Do not allow the water to boil. If the egg yolks start to go pale, turn the heat right down. They should still be runny when you serve them. After 45 minutes, turn the heat off and leave the yolks in the oil until you’re ready to use them.

Sweat the shallots and garlic in a frying pan with the olive oil. Add the morels, cover with a lid, and cook gently until the morels soften. This should take about 3 minutes. Remove the lid and allow the excess moisture to evaporate, concentrating the flavour. At this point add the crispy bacon (including the fat from cooking), tomato, spring onion, vinegar and paprika. Stir well and check the seasoning. Remove the pan from the heat and keep to one side.

Bring a saucepan of water to the boil. Blanch the asparagus for 2-3 minutes until tender.

To serve, divide the asparagus between 4 warm plates. Spoon the morel mixture over the asparagus and finish with a confited egg yolk on each.

Sprouting Broccoli with Poached Burford Brown Egg & Hollandaise

Serves 2

Ingredients
250g sprouting broccoli
2 medium Burford Brown eggs (or any other high quality, free-range eggs)
1 medium free range egg yolk
200g unsalted butter, melted
200ml white wine vinegar
1 sprig of thyme
½ clove of garlic, peeled
Sea salt flakes & freshly ground black pepper

Place 100ml white wine vinegar, a sprig of thyme and the garlic in a small saucepan and reduce by three quarters over a medium heat. Once reduced, set aside to cool.

For the Hollandaise sauce, create a bain-marie by placing a large Pyrex glass or metal bowl over a pot of gently boiling water. Remove the garlic and thyme from the vinegar reduction and add to the bowl along with the egg yolk and gently whisk. As the egg starts to thicken, whisk more vigorously until the mixture has tripled in volume (this is called a sabayon). Remove the bowl from the heat and slowly drizzle in the melted butter whilst whisking continuously until a thick, smooth sauce is achieved. If the mixture looks like it is not coming together (emulsifying) after a minute or two, then just continue to whisk and add a few drops of cold water.

Bring a pot of well-salted water to the boil and add your sprouting broccoli. Reduce the heat and simmer until tender (for about a minute), then drain in a colander and set aside.

In a medium saucepan, bring the remainder of the vinegar to the boil along with 100ml of water. Crack the Burford Brown eggs carefully into the boiling water and immediately turn off the heat. Allow the eggs to cook for a minute and a half for runny yolks or 2 and half minutes for firmer yolks. Remove with a slotted spoon and allow to drain on some kitchen paper.

To serve, arrange the sprouting broccoli flat in the middle of the plate, place the poached egg on top and liberally spoon over the Hollandaise sauce. Season to taste.

Rhubarb Soufflé

Serves 4

For the compote
375g fresh rhubarb, washed and chopped into 1cm pieces
180g caster sugar
1 cardamom seed, crushed
1 vanilla pod, split in half lengthways
2 large oranges, roughly chopped with skin on
125g stewed rhubarb for garnish

Pre heat the oven to 140°C / gas mark 1.

Put the rhubarb (discarding the leaves) into a shallow oven-proof dish, along with the oranges, cardamom, vanilla and sugar. Mix well. Cover and place in the oven for 40 minutes (or until the rhubarb is tender). Once cooked, remove from the oven and discard the oranges, vanilla and cardamom. Turn the temperature up to 180°C / gas mark 4. Whilst still hot, set aside around 8 tablespoons (125g) of the compote (stewed rhubarb) for garnish, and blend the rest until completely smooth. Keep to one side.

For the soufflé
215g rhubarb compote (recipe above, any left over can be frozen or stored in a jar for up to 2 weeks in the fridge)
3 large free range egg whites
65g caster sugar
45g cornflour
A knob of unsalted butter
Caster sugar for dusting

Mix 3 tablespoons of the purée with 3 tablespoons of cornflour. Place the remaining puréed compote into a large thick-bottomed sauce pan and bring to the boil. As soon as it is boiling, add the cornflour mixture and bring back to the boil, stirring continuously, for a further 2 to 3 minutes, until the mixture has thickened and coats the back of a spoon.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk the egg whites and sugar until soft peaks form. Gently fold the hot rhubarb base into the egg whites with a spatula.

Pre heat the oven to 180°C / gas mark 4.

Butter 4 soufflé moulds or ramekins and dust with caster sugar. Pour in the mixture and use a spatula to smooth the top of each one. Put in the oven for 8 to 9 minutes (you’ll know they’re cooked when they’re risen and golden brown). Do not open the door while they are cooking! Place the warm stewed rhubarb on top of each soufflé for garnish and serve immediately. At Balthazar, we sometimes serve with a little crushed shortbread.

Braised Ox Cheek ('Daube de Boeuf') with Pappardelle

Serves 6

Ingredients
2kg ox cheek, diced into 2 ½cm pieces (a good quality stewing beef could be used instead – check with your butcher)
150g pancetta or smoked bacon, diced into 1cm pieces
2 large carrots, chopped into 2 ½cm pieces……………….}
2 leeks (just the whites), chopped into 2 ½cm pieces……} equivalent of 500g in total
2 sticks of celery, chopped into 2 ½cm pieces……………..}
1 onion, finely diced
1 whole head of garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
1 bay leaf
1 sprig of thyme (just before serving, remove the whole sprig)
3 tbsp tomato purée
50g plain flour
2 lt red wine
1 lt beef stock (a good quality stock cube will do)
1 star anise (optional)
A knob of unsalted butter
Sunflower oil for frying
Sea salt & freshly ground black pepper

For the braised ox cheek
Place all the meat (including pancetta or smoked bacon), carrots, leeks, celery, onion, garlic, bay leaf and thyme into a bowl with the red wine, cover with Cling Film and put into the fridge for at least 24 hours (you can marinade for up to 2 days).

Drain the marinade into a heavy-bottomed saucepan or casserole (keeping the meat draining through one sieve over the sink or a bowl, and the vegetables in another) and bring to the boil. Once boiling, turn the heat down to allow the liquid to simmer and reduce it by half.

Put the flour into a shallow bowl, season it and, once the meat is thoroughly drained, coat it with the seasoned flour. Add a little oil and butter to a large oven-proof casserole, and fry off the meat until it browns (be careful not to burn it). Once the meat has been sealed, remove from the casserole and keep to one side. Add the drained vegetables into the same casserole and cook until soft for about 5 minutes. Add the tomato purée to the vegetable mixture and stir well (still on the heat). After a further 2 minutes of cooking, add the reduced red wine mixture to the vegetables, scrape all the bits stuck to the casserole (this is called “deglazing”) and stir well.

Pre heat the oven to 140°C / gas mark 1.

Add all the meat back into the casserole with the vegetables and red wine bring to a simmer. As the liquid starts to thicken, add the stock and bring back to just under boiling point. Put the lid onto the casserole and then into the oven and cook for 3 hours until the meat is tender.

Once cooked, the meat should be soft and almost falling apart and the sauce should be a rich reddy brown colour, now slightly thickened. The vegetables should be left in with the stew and served as is with freshly cooked pappardelle.

For the pappardelle
Semolina pasta can be purchased (Barilla do a version, widely available) which is obviously easier than making your own, but if you want to make it, here is the recipe. The dough is more difficult to handle than normal pasta as it tends to be harder and crumbly and can be a little challenging to put through the pasta machine, but the results are definitely worthwhile.

Ingredients
1kg fine semolina
4 medium sized free range eggs
6 to 8 tbsp water
Pinch of table salt
A generous knob of unsalted butter
3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

Put all the dry ingredients into a mixing bowl; add the eggs and 2 tablespoons of water and mix together by hand until it binders into a ball. If it is still very crumbly, add a little more water. You can also do this in a food processor. Once the dough ball has formed, flour a clean surface with a scattering of the semolina, flatten it out with the palms of your hands, cut it into pieces which will fit through the pasta machine. Cover it with Cling Film to avoid it drying out and leave to rest for 30 minutes. Put the pieces through the pasta machine (start with setting number 4 and work you way through the settings until number 1.5) and lay the pappardelle on a flat tray and keep to one side until you need it. When the beef is ready, put on a large pan of salted water and bring to the boil. Add the pappardelle and cook for 3 minutes. Drain and add the olive oil and knob of butter, and stir using the pan itself. The braised ox cheek and pappardelle are now ready to serve.